Special Cleaning Tips from a Professional Home Inspector

Ensuring that your house is sparkling clean is a sure way to get a good home inspector report. One thing that will devalue your property or turn off buyers faster is a home that looks grimy, uncared for, and dirty. That’s why you should clean your home like an expert when preparing for an inspection.

Here are special cleaning tips from a professional home inspector to help you do this job:

Clean Windows and Glass

Ensure that you have taken time to clean every window and its glass. Make sure that each of the glasses and windows is sparkling clean. Remember that windows let natural light into your home. If they are not immaculately clean, they won’t serve this purpose. Cleaning windows and their glass will bring in natural light and create a great first impression for your home. Therefore, take time to clean your mirrors and windows and polish them.

Clean the Ceiling and Flooring Surfaces

Clean tiles properly to ensure that they reflect light that enters your home through the windows. Make sure that carpets are also clean to look and feel cozy. Don’t forget to clean the dust and grime in the skirting boards. Also check for unsightly cobwebs on the ceilings especially in the top corners of your home. Also ensure that there is no dust in the ceiling skirting.

Clean Cupboards

People look inside the cupboards when viewing a home. The inspector will also check your cupboards both inside and out. Therefore, take time to clean the cupboards and install the necessary essentials. Ensure that your cupboards have an ample space rather than pipe up a junk that will tip out on the floor the moment they are opened.

Clean Drawers and Doors

Failure to clean the drawers and doors thoroughly is a major mistake that you can make when preparing for a home inspection. Apart from cleaning the cupboard doors, clean the internal doors too. Also clean the back and front doors of your home.

Clean out the dust and dirt that tend to collect behind drawers and doors. You may not notice this during regular cleaning. However, take time to remove it when cleaning your home in readiness for an inspection.

Clean the Kitchen and Bathrooms

Pay special attention to the kitchen and the bathroom. Clean the glass doors, stoves, behind toilets, sinks, oven tops, and taps. Leave your kitchen and bathroom sparkling clean. Also remember to empty rubbish.

If for any reason you can’t clean your home even with these special cleaning tips from a professional home inspector, hire a professional cleaner.

 

This special cleaning guideline was provided by TrueView Home Inspections, a Winnipeg home inspection company.

How To Playfully Involve The Kids in Cleaning The House

Children may not think that having a clean and tidy home is as important as you do. But with a few skills (and some patience) you can help them to create good housekeeping habits that will serve them well into their adult years. Here are some ideas for helping your kids to understand the importance of keeping the house (and their rooms) clean and organized. Make organizing fun. Blast some tunes and dance around while you pick up the house. Let kids know that cleaning and organizing doesn’t have to be drudgery. It can be something that’s fun to do together as a family.

Involve your kids in the cleaning process. Each child gets a special job. Reward good behaviour, too. One great way to do this is by hanging a chore chart on your refrigerator. Each day that the child’s room remains clean and organized, the child earns a checkmark. After a certain number of check marks have been earned, you may want to plan a family reward – going ut for ice cream or a trip to the swimming pool, for example. Keep the daily tasks small. Help kids to understand that if they stay on top of the daily chores (making beds, vacuuming, sweeping, laundry, and general tidiness), they don’t have to take a lot of time. A lot of kids like having a checklist to run through, too, when they are doing their daily or weekly clean up time.

Get organized. Make sure your kids’ rooms are set up to facilitate tidiness. Can your kids easily reach their closet rods? If not, it will be harder for them to hang up their clothes. Do they know the proper way to fold a shirt? Make sure you start your child off right with properly labeled bins, and, if they have too much stuff in their room, move some of the things they don’t play with as often into the playroom or family room. The same goes for the rest of your house: When everything has a “home,” from the car keys to the remote control, everyone in the house spends less time looking for things.

Make sure kids understand the virtues of tidiness, which can include better time management, fewer broken toys, and less frustration. Plus, when our living spaces are neat and tidy, we tend to naturally feel more comfortable and less stressed. Whenever we have finished tidying our home, I like to always comment to my kids how nice and relaxed it makes me feel. Typically, they will agree, even if helping me to tidy up the place wasn’t on their short list of priorities.

Be a good role model, and reinforce good habits. Make sure that your children know that when they make a mess, they need to clean it up, every time. When everyone in the house follows these same rules, they will, over time, become hardwired into the kids’ brains. And it helps a lot when they see parents cleaning a mess as soon as they’ve made it, too. Make sure you do the dinner dishes before you leave the kitchen for the evening and pick up your towel and straighten the bathroom after taking a shower.

 

Make sure you aren’t expecting too much, based on your children’s ages and stages. Very young children will often follow the example of the other children and adults when it comes to putting away their toys. A regular routine can help, and so can special “clean up” songs. Still, you’ll need to have lots of patience with toddlers and preschoolers, and older kids as well. They have lots of growing to do before they keep a spotless room. Understand that kids of all ages will have a different threshold for the kind of cleanliness that they will keep up. Let kids be kids, with certain guidelines, and know that their needs, abilities, and priorities in this area will expand and contract as they age.